March 2015

The role of renewable energy in South Africa’s energy mix

Power utility Eskom has implemented regular power cuts this year to prevent the national grid being overwhelmed, as South Africa faces its worst energy crisis in decades, Public Enterprise MinisterLynne Brown said earlier this week, adding that power outages cost the country between $1.7-billion and $6.8-billion a month.

Lynne Brown
Photo: Duane Daws

Lynne Brown

 
 

The solution to the energy crisis might be at home, as the country’s Renewable Energy IndependentPower Producer Procurement Programme was considered successful and combined the benefits of an auction-style programme with sufficient criteria to provide assurance that the projects were viable.

 

The combination of an excellent wind and solar resource, vast land availability, the country’s strong manufacturing capacity and an increasing commitment to renewable deployment from the government and financing institutions, made for an encouraging picture in the country. Concentrated solar power (CSP), in particular, stood out.

 

South Africa’s daily electricity demand has two peaks, one in the morning and another, more pronounced one, during the evening. This characteristic made CSP with storage the most suitable alternative among all renewable-energy sources for generating electricity to supply the evening peak demand.

 

Factors, such as the increasing energy demand, high electricity prices and limited proven oil reserves should hasten the implementation of CSP at a wider scale.

 

Despite the delays in the Department of Energy’s announcement schedule and other challenges, the South African market continued to generate great interest among international developers and financing institutions, which would meet at the CSP Today South Africa conference, in Cape Town, on April 15.

 

For more information, visit http://goo.gl/kyqnuU

Edited by: Chanel de Bruyn

Wind industry will join celebrations at Renewable Energy Festival in Cape Town

The South African Wind Energy Association’s (SAWEA) Wind4Communities working group is taking a stand at the Word Wildlife Fund’s Renewable Energy Festival at Green Point Track (Corner of Granger Bay Blvd and Fritz Sonnenberg Rd) on Saturday 28 March.

The group consists of members of the wind industry dedicated to working with communities to create benefits and sustainable initiatives from funds generated by wind energy in South Africa.

“As well as providing much needed power to the grid, wind energy generated substantial funds for nearby communities. We are dedicated to working with these communities to ensure these resources are used in the most effective and efficient way, to make a real difference to people’s lives,” explains group chairperson Marion Thompson-Green.

“We are also keen to provide members of the public with information about wind energy in general, the many benefits it brings to the country and any questions they may have for us.”

SAWEA will also be inviting festival goers to join the international #iheartwind awareness campaign, where visitors will be encouraged to write their reasons why they love wind on a specially designed poster and have their photograph taken with their personal words.  More about the campaign here: https://www.sawea.org.za/media-room/press-releases/217-sawea-launches-2015-iheartwind-campaign.html

The stand will also provide facts and statistics on wind energy and detailed information on community benefits and initiatives relating to wind energy.

Other festival events include: music, food and craft stalls and a variety of talks and presentations related to renewable energy.

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Editor’s notes:

For further information or to interview Johan Van den Berg, please mail: admin@sawea.org.za or call +27 (0) 11 2140664.

More information on the festival is available here: www.renewableenergyfestival.com

About SAWEA
SAWEA is a non-profit, industry organisation representing the wind industry in South Africa. Its members include both national and international entities active in the entire wind energy supply chain. Its aim is to promote the sustainable use of commercial wind energy in South Africa; to contribute knowledge and human resources to the streamlining of the policy and regulatory framework for wind in SA; to facilitate synergy between the growth of the industry and the achievement of the broader socio-economic aims of Government (including training, job creation and localisation); to disseminate information; to act as a focal point for discussion between members, government, the media and the public.
For more information visit: www.sawea.org.za

iheartwind Uploads

The South African Wind Energy Association (SAWEA) has launched an #iheartwind campaign, celebrating people’s love for wind energy across South Africa.

The campaign is based on the international hashtag #iheartwind which encourages people from around the globe to participate. Please join our South African campaign using these 4 easy steps:

  1. Print the #iheartwind poster here
  2. Write why you love wind power
  3. Take a photo of yourself with the sign – (you can even get creative and take your photo in front of a wind farm, or with the child that you hope to protect from pollution)
  4. Post it on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram with the hashtag #iheartwind and @_sawea
  5. Upload it to our dedicated page at https://sawea.org.za/iheartwind-posts by using the form below.

Multibillion-rand renewable-energy boost for EC

The East London industrial development zone (IDZ) will develop a wind farm that will generate in excess of three-million kilowatt-hours a year of electricity, Eastern Cape Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism MEC Sakhumzi Somyo announced on Wednesday.

He said the IDZ, which was working with a local wind turbine manufacturer, would save R98-million in electricity costs over 20 years and would strengthen energy security for industries based at the IDZ.

The Eastern Cape had a sizeable renewable-energy footprint with independent power producers (IPPs) having secured licences for 12 wind farms and one solar farm.

Somyo pointed out that, not only did renewable energy provide security of supply for the province, but IPPs would invest R1.6-billion in enterprise and social development programmes, which would benefit local communities over the 20-year life of the projects.

Local content for these projects, which was to be procured from within the province, was projected at R7.5-billion and would stimulate the development of localised industries and the green economy, said Somyo.

He further noted that the R3.5-billion Dedisa peaking power plant at the Coega IDZ would come on line later this year. The plant would generate 342 MW of electricity through its open-cycle gas turbines.

Somyo added that the agroprocessing and ocean economy sectors were also expected to contribute to economic growth and job creation in the province.

Edited by: Chanel de Bruyn

Wind industry to celebrate providing solutions to energy crisis at annual conference

The wind industry’s leading conference has announced dates for its annual conference in Cape Town.  The South African Wind Energy Association’s (SAWEA) ‘Windaba 2015’ will take place from 4-5 November at the Cape Town International Conference Centre.

The theme of this year’s conference is ‘Powering the Winds of Change’ and reflects the industry’s conviction that wind energy can fill South Africa’s current energy gap with low cost, clean electricity which can be brought on grid within a relatively short time frame.

“Our current energy crisis is causing us all to look harder for a solution to our power shortages,” comments SAWEA CEO Johan Van den Berg.”The Government and the public are realising that wind energy can bring more electricity to the grid quickly and cheaply. The Government’s renewable energy procurement programme (REIPPPP) has stimulated investment and created a thriving market for wind energy. Now we are in the position where we can rise to the challenge of helping to keep the lights on.”

A report from the Centre of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) earlier this year revealed that wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) power plants saved South Africa R500 million more than they cost in 2014. Electricity produced from these plants saved the power system R4.8 billion in diesel, coal and avoided load-shedding – as well as reducing the inconvenience and wider economical impact of blackouts. The cost of the renewable electricity was R4.3 billion.

“The government has set up a ‘war room’ to try to solve the current crisis and they asked us to submit figures demonstrating how quickly the wind industry can provide more wind farms and contribute more power to the grid. We had already concluded that renewable energy brings the only affordable, short to medium-term solution prop up our grid,” explains Mr James White (Vestas).

The inaugural conference attracts wind industry professional from all over the world, with more than 500 delegates attending in 2014. Another line-up of impressive speakers and government representatives is expected again this year.

 

-Ends-

Editor’s notes:

For further information or to interview Johan Van den Berg, please mail: admin@sawea.org.za or call +27 (0) 11 2140664.

WINDaba is the official wind industry event hosted by the South African Wind Energy Association (SAWEA) in partnership with GWEC. The annual conference and exhibition will take place from 4-5 November 2015, at the Cape Town International Convention Centre. For further information please visit www.windaba.co.za

CSIR report referenced: http://www.csir.co.za/docs/Financial%20benefits%20of%20Wind%20and%20PV%20in%202014-%20CSIR%20-%2021Jan2014_FINAL.pdf

About SAWEA

SAWEA is a non-profit, industry organisation representing the wind industry in South Africa. Its members include both national and international entities active in the entire wind energy supply chain. Its aim is to promote the sustainable use of commercial wind energy in South Africa; to contribute knowledge and human resources to the streamlining of the policy and regulatory framework for wind in SA; to facilitate synergy between the growth of the industry and the achievement of the broader socio-economic aims of Government (including training, job creation and localisation); to disseminate information; to act as a focal point for discussion between members, government, the media and the public.

For more information visit: www.sawea.org.za

SAWEA launches local #iheartwind campaign

The South African Wind Energy Association (SAWEA) has launched an #iheartwind campaign, celebrating people’s love for wind energy across South Africa.

The campaign is based on the international hashtag #iheartwind which encourages people from around the globe to participate. Please join our South African campaign using these 4 easy steps:
 

  1. Print the #iheartwind poster here
  2. Write why you love wind power
  3. Take a photo of yourself with the sign – (you can even get creative and take your photo in front of a wind farm, or with the child that you hope to protect from pollution)
  4. Post it on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram with the hashtag #iheartwind and @_sawea
  5. Upload it to our dedicated page at https://sawea.org.za/iheartwind-posts by using the form below.

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New study forecasts doubling of renewables capacity by 2025

The global installed capacity of renewable energy could more than double to 3 203 GW in 2025 from 1 566 GW in 2012, new analysis by Frost & Sullivan shows.

The study, titled ‘Annual Renewable Energy Outlook 2014’, anticipates an average yearly growth rate of 5.7% and for solar photovoltaic (PV) technology to account for 33.4% of total renewable-energy capacity additions over the period.

Wind is expected to follow with 32.7% of new capacity additions, ahead of hydropower at 25.3%, while other renewable technologies will represent the remaining 8.6%.

Industry director Harald Thaler also expects emerging economies to play a larger role, as the weak economic climate in Western Europe affects support schemes.

More than 130 countries currently have supportive policies in place for renewables, which has translated into a dramatic rise in renewables investment in recent years.

In addition, a decline in the cost of renewable energy, as a result of technological innovation and economies of scale, has also enabled developing countries to adopt these technologies.

The cost of solar PV modules, for instance, have dropped by about 70% between 2008 and 2013, making solar more competitive with fossil-fired power and driving accelerated adoption rates.

Renewable-energy installations in 2013 saw the continued, gradual shift in market power to emerging economies, where economic growth and revised energy priorities will drive a sustained increase in the adoption of renewable energy,” Thaler says.

Edited by: Creamer Media Reporter